Sunday, July 6, 2008

Missing

When I was little, Mom homeschooled my brother and I, and for several years into our early childhood, we weren't allowed to go get breakfast or watch TV in the morning unless we had cuddled with her first. Every morning we'd clatter into her bedroom and dangle our muffed-up heads over her face as we asked, "Mom, can I go get some cereal?" "Mom, can I get up now?" "Mom, I think Kitty needs me..."

"Just one quick snuggle..." she'd always say.

She'd pull us under the covers and bury her nose in our warm, fluffy hair and squeeze us tight. There's no real activity to cuddling, just resting and loving, so we'd tuck ourselves in tightly next to her, each on our own side, and lay there and let her warmth wash over us.

When I was five the local newspaper came to our house and interviewed me because I had written them a letter about how I thought they should do less stories about violence and more about cuddling. It was on the first page.

One of the last times I saw my mom truly alive (before the coma and respirator), she was in laying in her hospital bed as Dad and I sat and talked with her. I was really tired, so she pulled the covers down and invited me to come up and take a nap with her. There was not a moment's hestiation as I pushed the tubes and wires aside and crawled into her big, squeaky hospital bed. I laid myself down in the nook that had always been mine on those mornings at home so long ago, and tucked my now bigger head under her chin, resting my cheek against the soft skin on her chest. My legs dangled off the foot of the bed as she wrapped her arms around me and kissed my hair. We drifted off to sleep together that way, soft and warm and overgrown.

I don't think I'll ever stop missing that.

7 comments:

Joanna said...

i know.

proseandconverse said...

As a mother, and as a daughter, this post really got me in the heart. You have a truly beautiful way of sharing such heartbreaking memories, and the way you craft your words adds such heart and depth and elegance where it would be easy to just leave it at sad. I really applaud your talents, and am in awe of your remarkable heart.

proseandconverse said...

As a mother, and as a daughter, this post really got me in the heart. You have a truly beautiful way of sharing such heartbreaking memories, and the way you craft your words adds such heart and depth and elegance where it would be easy to just leave it at sad. I really applaud your talents, and am in awe of your remarkable heart.

Girl Friday said...

MUST read that article. What a wonderful reminder of your spectacular momma. I miss her so. (and you too)

Suz Broughton said...

I can't help but love your mom. All the stories you have told about her make me feel like I knew her. As a mom this story was almost a lesson to me.
Thanks.

Alison said...

Thank you, my friend. You're so eloquent and paint such a picture with words that I feel like I have a special little window into those moments. I think you're wonderful, really wonderful.

Blackberry Cinderella said...

Truth is , you never will.
But you have this story and plenty more to share about her with those that knew her and those -like most of us here- that didn't...
and that must count for something, right?